Fieldnotes 2: “In New York City, you have to make your own space”

The following are excerpts from my fieldnotes describing a recent site visit. The names have been changed to protect privacy. Excerpt 1 Roughly 45-minutes into the three hour visit, I noticed something interesting happening. This wasn’t anything I hadn’t seen or … Continue reading

Prologue to the Research #RaisingDissertation

#RaisingDissertation.001#RaisingDissertation is a way to keep me sane and connected to the outside world while working, at times in isolation, on my dissertation research. From time to time, and depending on my mood, I will post draft excerpts from my dissertation research to this public blog. I welcome dialogue from subscribers, readers, and lurkers. I acknowledge that ideas belong to the universe. That said, however, if you wish to write about my research elsewhere, you must cite my work here. For those in the press reporting about the media and technology uses among ‘disconnected’ youth, and youths involved in foster care and juvenile justice systems, feel free to contact me directly. I’d love to share my research with you; this should not to be confused with doing your research for you. For others researching in this area, I also welcome your insights here. As always, I’m happy to connect.

The following is an excerpt from an ever-growing dissertation involving the mediated lives of vulnerable or ‘disconnected’ youth in New York City.

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An interventionist and an ethnographer walk into a bar

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This isn’t a joke, it really happened last night.

An interventionist and an ethnographer walk into the bar, the interventionist says, “I could not do ethnography! All they do is sit there and observe. They just listen. They can’t say or do anything! I can’t do that. I have to be like, ‘No! You are wrong!’

Wide-eyed and close-lipped, the ethnographer responds, “Hmmm. Interesting. Tell me more.”

Preview of My Upcoming #RLR2014 Talk

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On Monday, October 14th from 6-8pm I’ll be presenting at this year’s first Racial Literacy Roundtable at Teachers College, Columbia University. I’ll be discussing my current research that involves working with court-involved youth in NYC to develop a mobile platform using participatory design and ethnographic methodologies.

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Excerpt from my current research on #PD #mobile #youth #justice

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(Photo by Tara L. Conley)

The following is an excerpt from an article draft I’m currently working on about participatory design, mobile text messaging service, and court-involved youth:

During the summer of 2013 amid a controversial mayoral race in New York City[1], mayor Michael Bloomberg vetoed legislation that, in part, would create an independent inspector general to oversee the New York City Police Department (Goodman; 2013) and would allow for an expansive definition of individual identity categories under the current law. The four bills, together named the Community Safety Act (Communities United for Policing Reform; 2012), were brought forth by City Council as a result of a legal policing practice called Stop-and-Frisk. This policing practice allows New York City police officers to stop, question, and frisk citizens under reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.

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Court-involved youth and social meanings of mobile phones

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photo by Tara L. Conley

“The mobile is the glue that holds together various nodes in these social networks: it serves as the predominant personal tool for the coordination of everyday life, for updating oneself on social relations, and for the collective sharing of experiences. It is therefore the mediator of meanings and emotions that may be extremely important in the ongoing formation of young people’s identities” (Stald; 2008, pg. 161).

“Dependency Court involved youth rarely have access to a computer or cell phone, and even when they do, it is often only for a short period of time” (Peterson; 2010, pg. 7).

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