Preview of My Upcoming #RLR2014 Talk

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On Monday, October 14th from 6-8pm I’ll be presenting at this year’s first Racial Literacy Roundtable at Teachers College, Columbia University. I’ll be discussing my current research that involves working with court-involved youth in NYC to develop a mobile platform using participatory design and ethnographic methodologies.

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Pilot Study Bibliography: Participatory Design, CI Youth, & Mobile Tech

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The following is an ever growing alphabetized bibliography (you’re welcome) of my current doctoral research involving participatory design, court-involved youth, and mobile technology.

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Excerpt from my current research on #PD #mobile #youth #justice

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(Photo by Tara L. Conley)

The following is an excerpt from an article draft I’m currently working on about participatory design, mobile text messaging service, and court-involved youth:

During the summer of 2013 amid a controversial mayoral race in New York City[1], mayor Michael Bloomberg vetoed legislation that, in part, would create an independent inspector general to oversee the New York City Police Department (Goodman; 2013) and would allow for an expansive definition of individual identity categories under the current law. The four bills, together named the Community Safety Act (Communities United for Policing Reform; 2012), were brought forth by City Council as a result of a legal policing practice called Stop-and-Frisk. This policing practice allows New York City police officers to stop, question, and frisk citizens under reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.

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Transcribing data on a Sunday afternoon

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Excerpt of transcribed audio from the first TXT CONNECT youth advisory board meeting on March 12, 2013:

What we’re doing is building a communication platform for these young people. It’s not just mobile text messaging. It’s Facebook–and another thing I was thinking with the Facebook page is to do exactly what you guys are saying and suggesting, which is to build this community online where young people can feel like ‘Okay, I know exactly where I need to go to get information.’ The platform that we’re trying to build–the purpose of it is to connect all of these resources together for young people. It’s like a one-stop shop for [court-involved youth] who want to get information about A, B, or C. They know they can go to whatever it is that we’re calling it.